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UK researchers tackle pain

Imperial College and the London Pain Consortium partner with a Japanese chemical company to fight chronic pain


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Wellcome Trust conference The Challenges of Chronic Pain

11-13 March 2015
Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK

Abstract deadline: 30 January 2015
Registration deadline: 16 February 2015

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Past Research
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Tissue-specific and inducible knock-outs
We manipulate genes in mice to understand more about pain pathways. Many broadly expressed genes are involved in a variety of physiological processes, and so specific drugs (of which there are few) or conventional gene deletion techniques are not particularly
Functional properties of identified trigeminal primary afferents and adaptive changes following acute and chronic inflammation
The trigeminal ganglion is the most complex sensory ganglion in the body as it innervates a large variety of tissues that clinically give rise to distinct pain symptoms ranging from headache to tooth ache to various forms of facial pain and temperomandibular joint dysfunction . A
Mechanisms of HIV viral envelope protein gp120-induced painful neuropathy
Painful peripheral neuropathy affects approximately 30% of HIV patients. Although the precise aetiology of HIV-associated painful neuropathy is unknown, direct invasion of cells of the nervous system by HIV is unlikely. There is evidence however that the presence of t
The Mechanisms of Secondary Hyperalgesia
The phenomenon of secondary hyperalgesia provides an excellent experimental tool to examine nociceptive induced changes in central neuronal excitability that are not a simple reflection of increased primary afferent input. By studying neuronal activity in area